Active Learning Psycho-educational Program, How it Works?

Active Learning Psycho-educational Program, How it Works?

HOW

Scientific Scrutiny of Psychology & Psycho-educational Program How psycho-educational program works?

There is no set-in-stone syllabus for our psycho-educational program.

Because every child’s problem is complex and diverse, the Tree Group’s clinical team is dedicated to conducting research for each individual child and build the individualized psycho-educational curriculum for the individual child.

It is a great gift for us to witness the small miracles that these children make.

The Active Learning psycho-educational program runs a step-by-step operating system based on clinical and scientific facts. Every step is critical to the child’s clinical and psycho-educational progress, and it is essential that the child’s parents and guardians are fully aware of and engaged in this operating system.  

Phase Zero (1-4 weeks): Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation, Feedback, and Program Selection

Phase Zero is the preliminary stage where an individualized psycho-educational program is prepared. After completing the Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation, the clinician delivers the evaluation results and feedback to the parents and school professionals.   

 

If the evaluation results reveal that the child’s cognitive ability, language development, emotional and behavioral development, and/or social skills are two or more year behind his peers, then he is recommended to participate in our psycho-educational program. 

 

If the child has delays in academic and language development particularly, followed by emotional behavioral problems, then he is recommended to partake in our program for about two years, during which the Stream After-School Program and Summer/Winter Intensive Programs are run throughout spring and fall semesters and summer and winter breaks, respectively.  

 

However, if the child shows extensive delays in most functional and developmental areas, including cognitive ability and language development, then he is strongly recommended to enroll in the Bridge School of Life Program. It is a full-day, treatment program where a child temporarily stops attending school, focuses on clinical treatment and individualized psycho-educational treatment for development in his delayed areas, and returns to school at a higher grade level. 

 

Pre-steps of Active Learning Psycho-educational Program

Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation

Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation

Clinician's feedback

- Clinician’s feedback provided to parents, guardians, and if necessary, school professionals

- Clinician’s feedback on the child’s compatibility with the Active Learning psycho-educational program and recommendations

Parents or guardians select in which program to participate

- Bridge School of Life Program: if extensive delays are found in all areas, including cognitive ability and language and academic development

- Stream After-School Program & Summer/Winter Intensive Program: if partial delays are found in areas, including cognitive ability and language and academic development, which accompany emotional behavioral problems.

Phase 1 (1-2 months): Initial Research for Individual Psycho-educational Plan and System Establishment

Upon completion of the registration in the Active Learning program, clinicians analyze the data from the Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation results to set initial clinical and psycho-educational treatment goals and write detailed initial treatment plans. 

 

During the course of this phase, Dr. Cho and his team set the top priority clinical treatment goals and initial psycho-educational goals to help improve the child’s language and learning development. They then develop psychological module and individually tailored psycho-educational strategies to achieve the goals.  

 

These initial treatment goals and treatment strategies are written in an Individualized Psycho-educational Plan, called IPEP, by the child’s primary clinicians. The treatment team then sets the treatment procedures and guidelines and starts conducting structured sessions. 

 

In order to objectively observe the child’s cognitive and behavioral progress development, the treatment team takes the behavioral modification approach in all sessions with the Behavior Charts. The Behavior Charts are composed of the Clinical Chart and Psycho-educational Chart and used to reinforce the positive behaviors incorporated into the initial clinical goals.   

 

Once the child becomes used to the Behavior Chart system, the Home Chart is provided to the parents to target the child’s primary clinical goals.  

Initial Planning for Individualized Psycho-educational Plan and Development of an IPEP, Individualized Psycho-educational Plan

TP Treatment Plan

TP Treatment Plan

- Analysis on the data from Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation results

- Set clinical and psycho-educational treatment goals and create the initial Treatment Plans

- Select the initial treatment strategies to achieve the clinical treatment goals

IPEP System

IPEP

- Select the initial treatment strategies to achieve the psycho-educational goals

- Develop and establish an individualized clinical and psycho-educational curriculum

- Develop and establish quarterly clinical and psycho-educational treatment plans

- Set each clinician’s role and treatment procedures

- Completion of IPEP, Individualized Psycho-Educational Plan

Applying the initial clinical and psycho-educational strategies to the very first session

Behavior Chart

- Begin clinical and psycho-educational sessions in a structured manner

- Develop and apply Clinical and Psycho-educational Charts to reinforce the treatment target behaviors

- Develop and deliver Home Charts for the child to achieve the treatment goals at home

Phase 2 (2 months ~): Proceed with clinical and psycho-educational treatment according to the planned curriculum

After Phase 1, where initial treatment strategies are developed based on the IPEP and applied in treatment sessions until they become stabilized, clinicians continue with treatment according to the individualized treatment plan. Every clinical behavioral response which the child displays during sessions is recorded and shared with the entire clinical team.

 

If clinicians find newly observed problematic behaviors, cognitive/academic difficulties, or emotional behavioral problems from the child, then they analyze the cause of these problems and make changes to treatment priorities as needed.

Clinical and psycho-educational treatment in accordance with the planned curriculum

Step 1: Stability

- The IPEP-based strategies are stabilized as treatment sessions progress.

Clinical &
Psychoeducational Sessions

Planned Curriculum
- Continue proceeding with clinical treatment according to the individualized curriculum.

- Child’s behavioral responses are scientifically recorded and shared with the entire treatment team.

- Monitor newly observed problem behaviors, cognitive/learning difficulties, and emotional behavioral problems and identify the cause of these problems.

- Add new goals or make changes to treatment priorities as needed.

Phase 3 (3 months~ ): Generalization of treatment strategies, precautions, and prevention methods

Among the clinical/psycho-educational strategies that have shown treatment effects during Phase 2, strategies that are necessary for a child’s behavior modification or learning progress at home or school go through the generalization process in the following ways.  

 
First, parents and guardians get educated and trained to apply the same treatment strategies, which clinicians have used in the clinical and psycho-educational settings and have been proved successful. This process of getting trained is very important for the child to continuously achieve both the clinical and psycho-educational goals in the treatment plan. 

 

There are several caveats in the process of transferring the treatment strategies from clinicians to parents. Because these were developed in clinical setting, it may not be easy for parents to acquire effective Treatment skills. Particularly, the way parents and guardians discipline or teach their child is often not consistent; during Phases 1 and 2, clinicians identify such inconsistencies, find the most effective disciplinary methods out of all methods that they have been using at home, incorporate them into the clinical strategies and try to make them work as consistent as possible. Parents and guardians may find difficult to become familiarized with the newly learned Treatment skills and how to discipline and respond to their child in a consistently effective manner. If one of the parents who is relatively busier than the other does not acquire these skills, it can hinder consistent treatment strategies from being fully implemented at home. Parents and guardians should consider themselves a core member of the treatment team to prevent such problem from occurring and actively participate in implementing the recommended treatment strategies at home for their child’s Treatment progress.   

 

When these treatment and disciplinary strategies are successfully transferred to all of the child’s parents and guardians, they may also be partially transferred to school professionals. In case the child’s symptoms are severe or the treatment team has established a cooperative partnership with the school before proceeding with the psycho-educational program, these strategies can be shared with the school professionals immediately after Phase 2.  
 

Usually, we find it more challenging to share these strategies with local Korean schools; however, international schools that have professional resources may be capable of implementing these to their classrooms. Still, we fully respect that school professionals have their own expertise and are aware that they may have different opinions about behavior modification approaches and treatment strategies. However, building close partnerships with the schools is important for the students’ progress although all of us have time and resource constraints.  
 
In addition, because a large amount of additional research and advisory time should be devoted to gaining cooperation from school professionals, we need to work efficiently to the extent possible with these limitations in mind. All of these processes are shared with parents; their dedication and trust are essential for their child in creating a strong, collaborative system between the school and our institution. If the parents or caregivers feel uncomfortable with such a partnership, we cannot build one on our own, and thus, it is desirable to start the partnership with the school only when the parents and guardians are ready. 

Phase 4 (4 months ~) Quarterly Feedback Sessions

In Phase 4, the treatment team provides a quarterly feedback session to parents on the clinical and psycho-educational progress the child has shown over the past 3 to 4 months, or a quarter term – Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall. This feedback session takes place during the regular clinical session, and the primary clinicians review the initial treatment goals and explain how their Treatment strategies to achieve these goals have reduced the child’s problematic behaviors and improved his language or learning development over the past term.   
 
screen time, sleep hygiene, etc.). Adolescents are invited to participate in the feedback session unless they have severe emotional behavioral problems. The quarterly feedback session requires both parents of the child to participate. In Korea, fathers still often take a passive position when it comes to parenting their child; however, we have recently observed more and more fathers begin to proactively participate in learning how to properly parenting their child, such as through the feedback session. To establish a consistent disciplinary system at home and reduce unnecessary conflicts within the household, both parents’ participation in the feedback session is necessary. The Treatment strategies built over a 3-month term of behavior observation and research are delivered to the parents and the clinicians learn other problematic behaviors the child shows at home from the parents so they can add those to the treatment plan.  The quarterly feedback sessions are held a week before the end of the term, so the IPEP, including the treatment plan and consent from which must be signed by the parents, can timely be updated with and the child’s treatment continues in the following term. 
 

 

Process of Generalization of Treatment Strategies Implemented in Clinical Setting to Home and School Environments

Process of Generalization of Treatment Strategies Implemented in Clinical Setting to Home and School Environments

- Transfer the proven-effective clinical/psycho-educational strategies to home and school to facilitate behavior modification and language/academic development at home through the generalization process

- Educate and train the child’s parents and caregivers with the same treatment strategies which clinicians are implementing in sessions

Precautions for Parents and Caregivers

- Parents or caregivers may have been providing inconsistent parenting practices for the child due to prolonged fatigue from years of various attempts to discipline the child.

- During Phases 1 and 2, the treatment team identifies the most effective parenting method used by the parents or caregivers and tries to mold it in a consistent manner.

- Parents or caregivers may find it challenging to learn the treatment strategies and behavioral approaches developed by the clinicians, or a relatively busier one of the parents may not participate in the treatment process as actively as the other one.

- The treatment team and the parents must act as one team; parents’ active participation will help maximize the treatment effect.

Precautions when Building Partnership with International Schools

- School professionals have their own expertise and may have different opinions about Behavior Charts based on psychotherapy based behavioral charts that are developed to facilitate language development

- Every school is staffed differently and has different policies about human resources and thus, there may be inflexibility in how much time school professionals can spend in adopting and implementing the suggested strategies.

- To maintain the partnership to work collaboratively, additional research and consultation time must be devoted not only by the school professionals but also by the treatment team, so both parties must recognize these limitations and collaborate on behalf of the student.

- When partnering with schools, a consent form for disclosure of information must be signed by the parents and caregivers, and they are strongly recommended to dedicate special effort and trust in all the professionals involved.

Quarterly Feedback Session

Quaterly Feedback Session

- After each 3-month term, clinical and psycho-educational progress observed in sessions is communicated with the parents in the quarterly feedback session.

Parents Participation

- Parents can see how the treatment strategies have reduced their child’s problematic behaviors and improved his or her language and learning. Discussions regarding which initial treatment strategies need to be modified will take place.

- The quarterly feedback session requires both parents to participate in order for the treatment strategies to be generalized at home and establish a consistent parenting practice at home.

- The treatment team explains the Treatment strategies developed and used over the past term to the parents and train them how to implement them at home.

- New or modified treatment goals are added to the treatment plan to handle the child’s problematic behaviors which his parents have observed at home.

Phase 5 (2 years~): Second Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation and Case Closing

Phase 5 begins after about two years in the program have passed. It is a step where clinicians re-evaluate and analyze how much the child’s cognitive, intellectual, linguistic, emotional behavioral, or social problems revealed from the initial Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation have reduced. It is not desirable to conduct the Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation too frequently; it should be conducted after 1.5 to 2 years after the initial assessment to objectively evaluate the effectiveness of a particular Treatment program, set new goals, and identify if any areas have not been developed.  
 
After retaking the Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation, the treatment team delivers their opinions on the direction of the program thereafter. If the initial treatment goals have been achieved, the case will be closed with the consent of the parents or he may continue with the program with new goals and objectives.

Phase 5 (2 years~): Second Comprehensive
Psycho-educational Evaluation and Case Closing

Second Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation

- Evaluation on the effectiveness of the treatment program after 1.5 to 2 years in the program through the second Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation

- Set new treatment goals and identify target areas that showed limited progress

- Case is closed if the initial treatment goals have been achieved and additional treatment goals are unnecessary to be added that the child can learn through regular, non-Treatment learning methods.

- If additional treatment goals and objectives are established, the child continues with the program.

Graduation from the Stream Program

- The child joins the Stream Program if his initial Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation results show that there are partial delays in his cognitive ability, language or learning development, emotional behavioral areas or physical development. The program runs after school during semesters and during breaks, the program continues in the form of Summer/Winter Intensive Program. At least one year of participation is strongly recommended.
- Requirements for Graduation from the Stream Program

- The second Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation shows that there are improvements in the areas that were below average (25th percentile) in the initial evaluation by improving at least 30th to 50th percentile range.

- School professionals consistently report for the past 6 months or more on the reduction of the child’s symptoms and one’s linguistic/cognitive/academic abilities were significantly improved.

- The child is receiving 70% or above on all of the school subjects for at least 2 consecutive semesters.

- The child’s parents all report for the past 6 months or more on the child’s improvement in all target areas of functioning.

Graduation from the Bridge Program

The child joins the Bridge Program if his initial Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation results show that there are extensive delays in his cognitive ability, language or learning development, emotional behavioral areas, or physical development that he is more than 2 years behind his peers especially in language and learning development. The participating child stops attending the regular school temporarily to join this full-day program; at least 2 years of participation is required.
- Requirements for Graduation from the Bridge Program

- The second Comprehensive Psycho-educational Evaluation shows that there are significant improvements in the areas that were below average (25th percentile) in the initial evaluation by improving at least 30th to 50th percentile range.

- School professionals consistently report for the past 6 months or more on the reduction of the child’s symptoms; and one’s linguistic/cognitive/academic abilities were significantly improved.

- The child receives 80% or above on all of the program subjects for at least 2 consecutive terms.

- The child’s parents all report for the past 6 months or more on the child’s improvement in all target areas of functioning.

- The child is ready to enroll in the regular school.

The System of Active Learning Psycho-educational Program 

 

Supervision and Teamwork

 
The Active Learning Psycho-educational Program runs under Dr. Yong Cho’s supervision and develops individualized treatment strategies and guidelines. 
 
The child’s responses and progress in all clinical and psycho-educational sessions are scientifically recorded. If he/she achieves 80% or more on a treatment goal for a certain period of time, then it is moved to the maintenance schedule to be continually monitored by clinicians and a new, or a higher-level treatment goal is added to be achieved.  

All information about the child that is needed for treatment is securely shared by clinicians through the online platform and the clinicians can build, update and implement treatment strategies as instantly as possible. 

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